Book Detail
All prices are approximate and are subject to change.
Medicine > Ethnic Medicine
Shattering Culture: American Medicine Responds to Cultural Diversity
Delvecchio Good, Mary-Jo
ISBN 13: 
9780871540607
ISBN 10: 
0871540606
Category: 
Ethnic Medicine
Edition: 
1
Publisher: 
Russell Sage Foundation
Format: 
Paperback
LC Call Number: 
RA410.53.S52 2011
Status: 
Active
Affiliation: 
Harvard Medical School
Audience: 
Professional
Dimensions: 
9.0 x 0.7 x 6.0 in
Pages: 
243
Weight: 
0.9
Retail Price: 
47.50
Quantity On Hand: 
0
Quantity On Order: 
0
Email | Print
Table of Contents
Synopsis:
Culture counts has long been a rallying cry among health advocates and policymakers concerned with racial disparities in health care. A generation ago, the women s health movement led to a host of changes that also benefitted racial minorities, including more culturally aware medical staff. Many health professionals would now agree that cultural competence is important in clinical settings, but in what ways? Shattering Culture provides an insightful view of medicine and psychiatry as they are practiced in today s culturally diverse clinical settings. Shattering Culture shows the human face of health care in America. Building on over a decade of research led by Mary-Jo Good, the book delves into the cultural backgrounds of patients and their health care providers, as well as the institutional cultures of clinical settings, to illuminate how these many cultures interact and shape the quality of patient care. Co-editor Sarah Willen explores the controversial practice of matching doctors and patients based on shared race, ethnicity, or language and finds a spectrum of arguments challenging its usefulness, including patients who fear being judged negatively by providers from their own culture. Seth Hannah introduces the concept of cultural environments of hyperdiversity describing complex cultural identities. Antonio Bullon demonstrates how regulations meant to standardize the caregiving process such as the use of templates and check boxes instead of narrative notes have steadily limited clinician flexibility, autonomy, and the time they can dedicate to caring for patients. Elizabeth Carpenter-Song looks at positive doctor-patient relationships in mental health care settings and finds that the greates successes in relationships are based on mutual recognition patients who can express their concerns and clinicians who validate them. In this book s final essay, Hannah, Good, and Lawrence Park show how navigating the maze of insurance regulatio

2010 - 2019 © Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc. 511 Feheley Drive, King of Prussia, PA 19406 | P: 800-345-6425 | F: 800-223-7488 |